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dibzzz Posted on 18/11 13:04
People who raise their voice at the end of

every sentance as if they're asking a question.

Does me head in.

Camsell_345 Posted on 18/11 13:06
re: People who raise their voice at the end of

Laergely a result of neighbours and home and away there have been studies done on the impact of these shows on our youth and they found that this australasian diction is a result of that.

dibzzz Posted on 18/11 13:10
re: People who raise their voice at the end of

I thought it would have been a passing fad, but it seems to be as strong as ever, it should be banned.

BillBones Posted on 18/11 13:11
re: People who raise their voice at the end of

It's called a rising inflection and it's disgusting.

While we're on, why do so many people refer to 'Railway Stations' as 'Train Stations'?

Seethe.

Borotmt Posted on 18/11 13:18
re: People who raise their voice at the end of

Correct me if im wrong but I think it called " moronic inflection", all down to Ausi soaps
Another local variation is how kids will trail of "sadly" ( as if appologising)at the end of a phrase esp if speaking in public ( School readings etc)
If my own kids had a reading to do Id coach them on "speaking with a tune"to rid themselves of this trail off.
"affected speach" the award goes to Carol Malia on BBC Look North. up down happy sad, steven Hawkins voice has more sincerity.

BillBones Posted on 18/11 13:39
re: People who raise their voice at the end of

Well, Rising Inflection is the proper term but I'd imagine 'Moronic Inflection' comes from the fact that morons do it. I'll go along with that.

Hammer_Smashed_Face Posted on 18/11 13:40
re: People who raise their voice at the end of

People who say "Can I get..." instead of "Can I have..." in food shops do my head in as well. Wannabe yanks.

Borotmt Posted on 18/11 13:44
re: People who raise their voice at the end of

I seem to remember some one coining it moronic as it infers the listener is a moron,ie "do you understand"
It is the most anoying habit, I like to reply " sorry, is that a question or a statement?" that seems to get the individual thinking about the way they speak.

BillBones Posted on 18/11 14:09
re: People who raise their voice at the end of

Here we are...

Link: Linkety Link

BillBones Posted on 18/11 14:09
re: People who raise their voice at the end of

Soz. Double trouble.

--- Post edited by BillBones on 18/11 14:09 ---

Link: Linkety Link

Drewred Posted on 18/11 14:44
re: People who raise their voice at the end of

Check out the number of people who use the following term

should of

when they mean should have

as in we should of won

My own favourite at work is receiving letters with an opening sentence of

I've had a letter off yous. Or, yous have sent me a letter

raggy Posted on 18/11 14:48
re: People who raise their voice at the end o

Can I chip in my dislike for the following language offenses

The innapropriate use of the words 'so' and 'not'.

Also cliches such as 'lets not go there'

Bring back the Queens English !!!

git_boy Posted on 18/11 14:48
re: People who raise their voice at the end of

i can't believe the number of people who say

"boro won't go down"

when they obviously mean

"boro will go down"


DOES MY HEAD IN!

chrism2050 Posted on 18/11 14:59
re: People who raise their voice at the end o

I have a few that I hate;

"I will learn you" (heard teachers say this one) instead of "I will teach you"

The inappropriate use of "your" instead of "you're" and "were" instead of "Where"

Lets send everyone back to school

BillBones Posted on 18/11 15:06
re: People who raise their voice at the end of

I can't stand 'different to' instead of 'different from'. My ten year olds know the difference.

People who use 'invite' as a noun need horse whipping. 'I sent those invites out'. No, you sent those invitations out, you massive spastic.

A very common mistake is saying 'those ones' or 'these ones'. I'm guilty of it myself.

Rod100 Posted on 18/11 15:37
re: People who raise their voice at the end of

when people say "arsenal won liverpool" for example - no they didn't you moron they BEAT them.

dibzzz Posted on 18/11 22:14
re: People who raise their voice at the end of

Stephen Fry would applaud everyone on this post.

Honestly, if someone raised their voice at the end of a sentance again for no good reason, I'd feel the urge to kick them in the coont or ballacks.

ravsplumber Posted on 18/11 22:52
re: People who raise their voice at the end of

People who use "loose" instead of "lose" as a verb to denote a loss of something.

Boro_inleeds Posted on 18/11 22:59
re: People who raise their voice at the end of

If you don't have a rising inflection in Leeds you are in the minority.
I used to do it for a while until a mate of mine called me a tvvat until I stopped. Didn't even realise I was doing it, strange how you subconciously pick things up.

PumpingGnome Posted on 18/11 23:29
re: People who raise their voice at the end of

People who say "due to" instead of "owing to" (and vice versa). Everybody knows that "due to" is adverbial and "owing to" is adjectival. In other words you substitute "due to" with "caused by" and "owing to" as "because of".

And don't get me started on the misuse of apostraphes to designate plurals.

dibzzz Posted on 18/11 23:40
re: People who raise their voice at the end of

It is just utter tw@t talk isn't it? Glad your mate pointed it out Boroinleeds.

I've done the same thing, my brother did it once (who's more than old enough to know better), just once, and I came down on him like a ton of bricks, I said to him,

'You sound like a fooking tw@t, since when does someone from Teesside speak like that?'

He admitted his mistake, apologised like a real man and we carried on getting pissed. He's never spoke like that since, not in my company anyway.

So let's start a campaign, let's stamp out 'Rising Inflection' or HRT (high-rise terminals) or whatever they call it!

If you hear anyone talking in this ludicrous manner, pull them up, tell them they sound stupid, make them embarrassed, make them think twice, then they will stop and hopefully spread the word.

Rant over. *in rising voice*

Boro_inleeds Posted on 18/11 23:51
re: People who raise their voice at the end of

Yeah I agree Dib, problem is it would turn into a full time job for me if I started doing that here.
When you hear something for so long it can become acceptable because we have the tendancy of initiating some kind of auto fit in function, safety in mumbers and all that.
This does really annoy me now though but not as much as "worrit" instead of "was it", if I ever catch myself saying that I will have to top myself.

dibzzz Posted on 18/11 23:56
re: People who raise their voice at the end of

BoroinLeeds:
I must admit, you have a point, when everyone is at it you sort of filter it out and don't notice anymore; This is what I'm afraid of, in two generations time everyone will be speaking like that, we've got to put a stop to it.

Arrrghhhhh!!!!!

mfcineurope Posted on 18/11 23:57
re: People who raise their voice at the end of

owie then, instead if come on then, or is this an acceptable local coloqunism.

Camsell_345 Posted on 19/11 0:03
re: People who raise their voice at the end of

"Them" instead of "those" is a very Teesside thing as well, as in

I want one of them.

no

you want one of those.

dibzzz Posted on 19/11 0:05
re: People who raise their voice at the end of

Yes, regional dialect quirks are essential part of the English language, terms such as 'owie then' and 'oggie raiding' of which there are thousands across the country add to a person's identity.

This HRT nonsense is just a bastardisation of the English language.

Boro_inleeds Posted on 19/11 0:11
re: People who raise their voice at the end of

Yeah, don't know how it came about, or why it is so common down here. Don't the geordies do it as well ?

sad_man Posted on 19/11 1:49
re: People who raise their voice at the end of

I live in Australia. I guess I'll get used to 'rising inflection.'

--- Post edited by sad_man on 19/11 1:51 ---

Boroz Posted on 19/11 4:28
re: People who raise their voice at the end of

I live in Sydney so have got used to it. Mind you coming back to England, right, the equivalent at the end of phrases, right, is to look for confirmation with the word right, right? Try telling a joke in England without saying there was this bloke, right, when into a pub, right.....etc etc
Other variations, like, can involve other words like like, like. When you're not used it, it sounds just as bad, like.
Every accent does the same thing in different ways - apart from Stephen Fry's maybe, don't you know.

gagarin Posted on 19/11 10:43
re: People who raise their voice at the end of

Less and fewer are often used wrongly.
"8 items or less" always winds me up.

When did we start replacing "up to.." with "down to.." ?
We used to say a decision was "up to him" . Now you hear "It's down to him".

Language evolves and regional dialects add to the richness of it but the rising inflection thing is just horrible!

grantus Posted on 19/11 10:49
re: People who raise their voice at the end of

I like it when it's said by an Australian woman.

Anyone else sounds like a t'sser when they do it.

TEEBAG Posted on 19/11 10:50
re: People who raise their voice at the end of

why would stephen fry applaud everyone on here dibzzz,are we suppose to look up to the guy does he speak properly whilst he is doing some young chap up the rear

bandito Posted on 19/11 10:51
re: People who raise their voice at the end of

what about these idiots that say "or am loving that"

feck off

maturesmogette Posted on 19/11 11:47
re: People who raise their voice at the end of

I detest the expression "yous" when someone means more than one person. Also "can I lend" instead of can I borrow or he "borrowed me" instead of he loaned me. Total ignorance of the english language. One of my sons is guilty of this sometimes and I always point it out to him. He just laughs and says "does it matter". I don't suppose it does but it just really annoys me.

grantus Posted on 19/11 11:49
re: People who raise their voice at the end of

Language evolves, text speak is here to stay, americanisms and inflections are going nowhere.

The english language has been bastardised almost beyond recognition.

Get with the program, or forget about it.

plymuff_diver Posted on 19/11 12:22
re: People who raise their voice at the end of

It's widely practiced down here. Though I think it has its roots in genuine confusion.

Jesus! Me and Gull-boy-Death-Freak agree on something.

HarryBasset Posted on 19/11 14:02
re: People who raise their voice at the end of

And another thing! BBC Tees newsreaders persist in saying "A car lost control." Either the car went out of control or the driver lost control.

Boro_Gadgie Posted on 19/11 14:14
re: People who raise their voice at the end of

Teebag, Fry was on 101 a few years back and one of the things he wanted put in there was "AQI" or "Australian Question Intonation" as he called it. My boss often uses it, which I find most irritating. I've stopped short of having a go at him, but once said "Are yer asking me or telling me?", which a few people in the office smiled at, as they knew what I was referring to. He's in his forties for crying out loud, so should know better. There's also a couple of other lads who work at our place who use it.

TheBoroBoss61 Posted on 19/11 15:26
re: People who raise their voice at the end of

Jim Bowen used "Are you asking me or Telling me" for years on Bullseye when someone gave an answer to a question.

Long before those shi-te Aussie Soaps

The_DiasBoro Posted on 19/11 15:30
re: People who raise their voice at the end of

I remember hearing AQI in the West Country 40 years ago. It must have been exported to Oz with the Tolpuddle martyrs, resurfaced on Neighbours and now you even hear yanks doing it.

bandito Posted on 19/11 15:31
re: People who raise their voice at the end of

raising ones voice , likE THIS YOU MEAN?

dibzzz Posted on 19/11 18:58
re: People who raise their voice at the end of

yes exACTLY LIKE THAT?

guisBOROugh Posted on 19/11 19:08
re: People who raise their voice at the end of

Blame the education system for people not speaking correctly. It was only when i was about 16 that i actually learned how to use the correct grammar etc, and thats only because i took the liberty of teaching it myself and figuring it out.
The schools waste too much time trying to make you understand dead languages in Macbeth and decoding useless poems.

Theres no wonder nobody can speak propperly and has no interestin learning to either.

I bet this post is riddled with spelling and grammar mistakes too.

guisBOROugh Posted on 19/11 19:09
re: People who raise their voice at the end of

As for the whole raising your voice thing.
My mate joined the forces, didnt take long before the bloody southerners had time talking like that.

BillBones Posted on 19/11 19:13
re: People who raise their voice at the end of

It certainly is GuisBOROugh.

I don't blame the education system. There's only so much they can do. Kids speak like their parents, not their teachers I'm afraid.

guisBOROugh Posted on 19/11 19:27
re: People who raise their voice at the end of

I still think they focus too much on teaching the wrong things.
I cant think of one thing that i've benefited from the literature and poetry that i had to study.

plymuff_diver Posted on 19/11 20:44
re: People who raise their voice at the end of

Ah the war poets. "This poem wouldn't be a metaphor for death by any chance would it Sir?"

FraudManager Posted on 19/11 21:07
re: People who raise their voice at the end of

I blame Mark Page, "yernoworrameeeenlike"